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Large Format Cameras in Action: Studio Product Photography Tutorial

Large Format Cameras in Action: Studio Product Photography Tutorial

Large Format Cameras are inconvenient, bulky and a very slow to work with. They also cost a lot and have a very limited use… everywhere except a studio of a product photographer. Large format cameras (monorail cameras) can do wonders in situations where most cameras and lenses (even tilt-shift) will fail.
The key is an extreme amount of possible tilt/shift/skew movements with any lens, and on any magnification level (i.e. any lens can be turned into a macro lens) large format cameras provide.

This was one of the shots where large format camera was very useful. In this premium photography tutorial, you’ll find a step-by-step behind the scene of shooting these two images you see below. Each shot was not possible without large format camera, and you will see how I’ve used my Cambo Ultima D monorail camera to get these shots of Norelco shaver.

You will also learn how to capture subject self-illumination (useful for any electronic devices) without doing a composite image, in a single click.

 Large Format Camera in Action: Studio Product Photography Tutorial

Large Format Camera in Action: Studio Product Photography Tutorial

Large Format Camera in Action: Studio Product Photography Tutorial

 

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 Large Format Camera in Action: BTS Video

 Large Format Camera in Action: BTS Video (Bonus)

 

Few shots which did not make to a post-production, “as-is” from the cameralarge-format-camera-in-action-tutorial-result

large-format-camera-in-action-tutorial-result1

 

 

   In the Gearbox


4 responses on "Large Format Cameras in Action: Studio Product Photography Tutorial"

  1. Hi, its very helpful article for me. I hope you will publish again in the future.
    Thank you !

  2. Very nice video Alex, and explained well. I am putting together a Toyo Outfit and hope to do some more watches!! :) Stay tuned!

  3. Hi Alex, I find your appoach and results quite appealing, especially with the horizontal strip + diffuser reflection off the razor’s black glossy surface. Superb result and very informative analysis. Really well done.

    In your second (bonus) video, analyzing the camera movements, you mention that you get a particular plane in focus by tilting the lens plane to be parallel to it.
    I think this is somehow inaccurate, due to the Scheimpflug intersection principle, where it states that what you mention is not actually required, i.e. you can tilt the lens plane less than to get it parallel to the required plane of in-focus and this is enough. How much tilting is actually determined geomethically, by devising the intersection of the three planes, the (required) plane to in focus along the subject, the lens plane and the digital back plane.

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